Xposure curators are currently in Prague with Erik Johansson, a Swedish-born visual artist that creates meticulous fantasy and iconic work.

Erik creates surreal images by recombining photographs and other materials. He captures ideas by combining images in new ways to create what looks like a real photograph yet with logical inconsistencies to impart an effect of surrealism.

It has been an enjoyable and creative two days curating and creating the ideas behind Erik’s centre stage event for Xposure festival this year. His live stage demonstration will give the audience a first-hand insight to how he creates the surrealism found in his art. There will also be a unique opportunity for one or two lucky members of the audience to participate and assist Erik in his live stage event at Xposure this year. Erik will also have an exhibition of both Limited Edition and Exhibition prints including unseen new works.

Its always a pleasure meeting and spending time with such creative people. Nothing was amiss with our meetings and even the iconic sketches appeared in his notepad. For those of you that don’t know, Erik is fascinated details and realism so much so that every aspect of his work is carefully sketched and planned down to meticulous detail, before he even thinks about picking up his camera. 

For Erik, taking photographs is rather collecting material in order to realise his ideas and a finished picture can consist of hundreds of photographic images. Each new project is a new challenge and Erik’s goal is to make each picture look as realistic as possible.

At xposure this year, we are introducing a surprise element on a larger scale. Several of our guest photographers and artists, including Erik will grab the opportunity to utilise this surprise element on several occasions through the festival period in such a way that visitors can watch what they are doing.

About Erik

Erik grew up on a farm in Götene, Sweden. “Growing up in the Swedish countryside has had a great impact on my visual style. Many of the environments I use in my pictures are places around where I grew up, with wide open landscapes and small red houses”. Erik had an interest in drawing and computers from an early age, escaping to other worlds through computer games. “When I was 15 I got my first digital camera, which opened up new doors for me.” However, it was the manipulation of the photograph that interested him the most, being able to create something that could not be captured with the camera. In 2005 he moved to Gothenburg to study computer engineering at Chalmers University of Technology. During his studies, he began publishing pictures online, which in turn led to offers of commissioned work from various advertising agencies. He began freelancing in tandem with his studies, landing more and more assignments. On graduating from Chalmers he decided to continue freelancing full-time as a photographer. “Even though I never worked as an engineer, I have a

During his studies, Johansson began publishing pictures online, which in turn led to offers of commissioned work from various advertising agencies. He began freelancing in tandem with his studies, landing more and more assignments. On graduating from Chalmers he decided to continue freelancing full-time as a photographer. “Even though I never worked as an engineer, I have a problem solving approach in the way I create my photographs.”

Creatives In Prague

We are currently in Prague with Erik Johansson, a Swedish-born visual artist that creates meticulous fantasy and iconic work.

Erik creates surreal images by recombining photographs and other materials. He captures ideas by combining images in new ways to create what looks like a real photograph yet with logical inconsistencies to impart an effect of surrealism.

For Erik, taking photographs is rather collecting material in order to realise his ideas and a finished picture can consist of hundreds of photographic images. Each new project is a new challenge and Erik’s goal is to make each picture look as realistic as possible.

At xposure this year, we are introducing a surprise element on a larger scale. Several of our guest photographers and artists, including Erik will grab the opportunity to utilise this surprise element on several occasions through the festival period in such a way that visitors can watch what they are doing.

For Erik, taking photographs is rather collecting material in order to realise his ideas and a finished picture can consist of hundreds of photographic images. Each new project is a new challenge and Erik’s goal is to make each picture look as realistic as possible.

At Xposure this year, we are introducing a surprise element on a larger scale. Several of our guest photographers and artists, including Erik will grab the opportunity to utilise this surprise element on several occasions through the festival period in such a way that visitors can watch what they are doing.

 

About Erik Johansson
Erik grew up on a farm in Götene, Sweden. “Growing up in the Swedish countryside has had a great impact on my visual style. Many of the environments I use in my pictures are places around where I grew up, with wide open landscapes and small red houses”. Erik had an interest in drawing and computers from an early age, escaping to other worlds through computer games. “When I was 15 I got my first digital camera, which opened up new doors for me.” However, it was the manipulation of the photograph that interested him the most, being able to create something that could not be captured with the camera. In 2005 he moved to Gothenburg to study computer engineering at Chalmers University of Technology. During his studies, he began publishing pictures online, which in turn led to offers of commissioned work from various advertising agencies. He began freelancing in tandem with his studies, landing more and more assignments. On graduating from Chalmers he decided to continue freelancing full-time as a photographer. “Even though I never worked as an engineer, I have a

During his studies, Johansson began publishing pictures online, which in turn led to offers of commissioned work from various advertising agencies. He began freelancing in tandem with his studies, landing more and more assignments. On graduating from Chalmers he decided to continue freelancing full-time as a photographer. “Even though I never worked as an engineer, I have a problem solving approach in the way I create my photographs.”